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Is Your Child Eating Too Much Sugar?

You may want to think twice if your little one asks for another glass of apple juice, as it reportedly contains the same amount of sugar as three Krispy Kreme doughnuts – according to new research

What’s more, a typical fat-free yoghurt contains five teaspoons of sugar.

The revelations were revealed in a new survey by Bupa, who is aiming to raise awareness about the amount of sugar in common children’s lunchbox items.

READ: NEW GUIDANCE RELEASED TO PREVENT CHILDREN AS YOUNG AS THREE SUFFERING FROM TOOTH DECAY

Despite this, 40 per cent of mums say their children have sweets, fizzy drinks or chocolate at least once a day.

Nearly 25 per cent of mums surveyed said they like putting sugary treats in their child’s lunchbox with the top culprits being cakes, chocolate, crisps and fruit juice.

On top of this nearly a third of mums think that as they give their children healthy food, sugar isn’t an issue.

READ: DRINKS YOU CAN GIVE YOUR TODDLER (AS WELL AS WATER OR MILK)

Too much sugar in a child’s diet can cause permanent damage to their health, including increased risk of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

It can also lead to dental problems, including tooth decay and gum disease.

Bupa's Clinical Director of Dentistry, Dr Steve Preddy, said, ‘Understanding the amount of sugar in a child’s diet is vital for their dental health. The findings from the research are really eye opening and show a huge disparity between how much sugar mums think is in certain foods and how much there actually is.’

READ: IS FRUIT JUICE BAD FOR YOUR CHILDREN?


The research comes as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) announce that schools and nurseries should run tooth-brushing schemes to improve the oral health of children.

The organisation’s new guidance is aimed at schools, nurseries and local authorities, who are advised to consider supervised tooth-brushing and fluoride varnishing schemes for areas where children are at high risk of poor oral health.

Dr Steve Preddy added: ‘With 26,000 primary school children admitted to hospital for tooth decay in the past year, there is a need now more than ever, for parents to be paying attention to their child’s sugar consumption.

‘Parents need to be regularly looking at the nutritional information of food products; it is often what are thought of as healthy foods or unexpected ones.’

Do you monitor your child’s sugar consumption? Let us know below.

 
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