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The Entertainer introduces 'Quiet Hour' for children with autism

Section: Toddler

A massive round of applause is thouroughly-deserved by The Entertainer, who have introduced a weekly Quiet Hour to create a 'more welcoming' envirionment for children with autism.

Bravo.

High street toy retailer have announced the hour of solace will happen every Saturday, in all of it's UK stores. 

Anyone with a child who has autism will know how shopping trips can be a daunting experience. They are often overwhelmed by loud noises and busy crowds, and frankly, a massive toy store on a weekend is simply a no-go.

During Quiet Hour, The Entertainer will turn off it's music in bid to create a more calming environment. 

Daniel Cadey, Autism Access Development Manager for The National Autistic Society, said: “We’re delighted that The Entertainer is taking this positive step to make shopping a better experience for autistic children. Small changes such as removing in-store music can make a huge difference to autistic people, who can struggle to filter out background noise which can cause them enormous distress. We hope to see other stores follow The Entertainer’s lead and make whatever changes they can to support the needs of all their customers.”

Autism affects one in every 100 people in the UK and can intensify sensory perceptions, making social situations difficult. Most children who suffer with autism will display signs or symptoms of autism before they are three – although the signs vary, there are a few early red flags to look for. 

The Entertainer's initiative comes just months after many popular retailers promised to make their stores more 'autism friendly' as part of a campaign.

Around 4,500 shops, including Toys R Us, Clarks and Sainsbury’s joined forces to make their premises autism-friendly, as part of a campaign by the National Autistic Society and Intu shopping centre.

An utterly amazing awareness campaign for autism. 

Now read:

Diagnosing autism: the myths to ignore

How to find the right games and activities for autistic children

 

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