Close Close
Mother and Baby

How To Register Your Baby’s Name

Section: Baby names
How To Register Your Baby’s Name

So, you’ve chosen a baby name, what’s next? We take you through the steps of registering your newborn’s name, before you change your mind…

Missing the deadline for registering your baby’s birth – and name – could land you with a £1,000 fine as singer Adele discovered when her son was born in late 2012. Unless you’re a multi-million earning global superstar, chances are you’d rather avoid the charge.



How long do I have to decide on a name and register it once my baby’s born?


You have 42 days, or six weeks, to register from the day your baby is born.

Most people register the birth within the first couple of weeks but you do have another four weeks if you’re still struggling to decide. 



How do I go about registering the name?


You need to take a trip to your local register office as your baby needs to be registered in the district in which he was born.

If your baby was born unexpectedly and not in your local area, don’t panic. Just go to any register office and the registrar will send your information to the right district office.

You’ll get the birth certificate in the post from your district office.



Who can register the birth of my baby?


Your options for registering your little one’s arrival depends on whether or not you’re married to your baby’s father. Even in 2013.

If you were married at the time of conception or birth, either parent can go alone to register the birth. If you are going to let your husband go alone, make sure he’s fully aware of the baby’s full name and how to spell it. Yes, it is worth double checking. And writing it down.

If you’re not married, you’ll both need to be present to register the baby’s birth and therefore name.



So there is no immediate panic when your baby is born to register his name, but just remember, you have six weeks.

If you are at your GP surgery having your six week check and have not registered the birth, then yep, you’ve done an Adele and could face a fine of £1000.

 
Related content:

Comments

No comments have been made yet.

"