Mother and Baby

2 weeks pregnant: advice, symptoms and what to expect

1-2 weeks pregnant - what you need to know

At two weeks pregnant, there is still no baby. At around day 14 of your menstrual cycle, which should be this week or early next, ovulation occurs. If you’re trying to conceive, knowing exactly when you’re ovulating is really important, so be sure to track yours using our ovulation calculator. 

There are certain symptoms you can look out for to see if you're ovulating and certain advice you should follow such as upping your baby-making time.

8 common symptoms to look out for at 2 weeks pregnant:

Expand Image

1) Your temperature will fall, then spike

Did you know that when you ovulate, your basal body temperature (BBT) will drop to its lowest point? It won’t, however, stay there for long and as soon as ovulation occurs, it will shoot up half a degree. So, although ovulation calculators give you a good idea, if you want to know exactly when you’re ovulating, buy a special thermometer and start tracking.
Expand Image

2) Breast soreness or tenderness

Hormonal changes brought about by ovulation can makes your breasts feel tender or sore.
Expand Image

3) Better sense of smell

Changes in your hormones at two weeks pregnant increases your ability to pick up a range of smells. Changes to your sense of smell may be linked to the necessary ability to pick up eligible male pheremones.
Expand Image

4) Your discharge might change

If you’ve been trying to conceive for a while, you’ll have got used to monitoring your discharge and will know it’s consistency and colour will change over the month. As you head towards the day you’re ovulating, look out for thick, sticky and creamy discharge, which will increase in volume and start to look cloudy when the day arrives. 
Expand Image

5) Light spotting

You might notice a small ammount of blood around the time of ovulation. This happens when the follicle around the egg ruptures. If the bleedy is heavy it could be something more severe. Let your doctor know if you experience anything unusual.
Expand Image

6) Pelvic ache

During ovulation, you may feel a pain in one side of your abdomen depending on which ovary releases the egg. The medical term for this phenomenon is 'Mittelschmerz' which means middle pain in German. In some cases, a small amount of vaginal bleeding or discharge may occur. Some women experience nausea, especially if the pain is severe.
Expand Image

7) Increased sex drive

During ovulation it is possible your sex drive will increase. Your body is naturally more inclined to part in baby-making activities.
Expand Image

8) Cervical changes

Some women check their cervix regularly, especially if they have been trying to concieve for a while. If you do check, at this point it may be higher, softer and more open during ovulation.

What is my body doing?

It sounds very complex, and in a way it is, but our menstrual cycles really are quite amazing. Thanks to hormone changes, your levels of luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) rise and stimulate the production of follicles in your ovary.

These follicles are actually fluid filed sacs containing those all-important eggs – although usually only one becomes larger than the others and produces the egg. That follicle also begins to produce oestrogen which helps the lining of the womb become thicker to aid ‘implantation’ of the egg.

Hopefully, in the 24 hours after the egg is released, one of the nearly 250 million sperm your partner releases will manage to swim all the way from your vagina, through your cervix, and up to the fallopian tube, where it can penetrate the egg.

It might sound simple, but this is a ten-hour journey for the sperm. Only about 400 of them will even make it and only one can burrow through the eggs outer membrane.

What happens next?

Once his sperm makes it to your egg, the sperm’s nucleus merges with the eggs and they’ll combine in the following 10 to 30 hours. Believe it or not, this is when the sex of your baby is actually determined, as if the sperm is carrying a Y chromosome, you’ll just have conceived a boy and if it’s an X chromosome, it’ll be a girl.

What can I do to help my body conceive?

It might sound obvious, but this is one week where you really need to get into the rhythm of regular, baby making fun. Try to relax and not turn this time into another chore. Have a read of the best sex positions to try when you’re trying to conceive and check out the foods which can boost sperm count. Experts believe that certain sex positions allow your man’s sperm to get closer to your cervix. The extra good news is that having an orgasm can help as the contractions draw in more sperm.

Take me back to week 1

Take me to week 3

 
Related content:

© Bauer Media Group

Bauer Media Group consists of: Bauer Consumer Media Ltd, Company number: 01176085,  Bauer Radio Ltd, Company Number: 1394141 Registered Office: Media House, Peterborough Business Park, Lynch Wood, Peterborough, PE2 6EA H Bauer Publishing, Company Number: LP003328 Registered Office: Academic House, 24-28 Oval Road, London, NW1 7DT. All registered in England and Wales. VAT no 918 5617 01

Bauer Consumer Media Ltd are authorised and regulated by the FCA (Ref No. 710067)

 
"